Welcome to HistoryWow

Why ‘Wow’? Because history has a ‘Wow’ factor. History is rich in fascinating and inspirational incidents and events. Stories of heroism, self-sacrifice, humor, arrogance, foolishness, victory against the odds, the cruel hand of fate, irony and nobility.

History’s got the lot. Since 2012, HistoryWow’s aim, using only the finest historical reference material, has been to bring you some of these fascinating and inspirational incidents and events, in a short, sharp format. A little bit of history every day. But not enough to overload your busy lifestyles. We hope you enjoy HistoryWow!

World War One caused by English Medical Incompetence

Tens of millions died as a result of the cataclysm that was the First World War.

Our groundbreaking research here argues that English medical incompetence was the cause of the horrific events of 1914 to 1918.

Audio Summary

Media Release  

Research Paper

History Question of the Day

What was significant about the “Simms Motor War Car”, first demonstrated in 1902?

The answer tomorrow.

Yesterday's question and answer:

The British police, “once known as the world’s finest police organisation, will be the laughing stock of Europe”. So said an anonymous letter sent to a British newspaper in 1902. Why?

Answer: The letter was complaining about the British police’s new technology that “insists in trying to trace criminals by odd ridges on the skin”. The technology? Fingerprints.

Source: Convicted – Landmark Cases in British Criminal History by Gary Powell

More at: History

View Archives

The HistoryWow Research Team

The HistoryWow research team is led by principal researcher Benjamin S V Bray, who has a first class honours degree in history from Edinburgh University and a masters degree in philosophy majoring in history from Cambridge University.

Ask HistoryWow

The History Wow Search Engine. "Ask HistoryWow"

History Question of the Week

The famous doomed ‘Charge of the Light Brigade’ took place during which conflict?

The answer on Thursday.

Submit Answer

The first correct answer to each week's question will receive a US$30 voucher to buy a history book of their choice.

Last week's question and answer:

The continent of Australia was first circumnavigated, Great Britain declared war on France, and the United States completed the Louisiana Purchase. What is the year?

Answer: 1803.

Source: The Encyclopedia of World Facts and Dates by Gorton Carruth
 
More at: History

HistoryWow’s Golden List of Great History Books

There are many great history books, on a range of interesting topics. These are some of the ones we at HistoryWow think are especially good.

These excellent books are available at: History

View List

The HistoryWow Forum

CALLING ALL HISTORY BUFFS!

The fascinating thing about history is that there are a variety of different opinions and views on historical questions. Here is your chance to tell us what you think about a particular history question.

THIS WEEK'S HISTORYWOW FORUM TOPIC IS:

Despite its name, there was nothing truly revolutionary about the American Revolution (1775-1783). What do you think?

More at: History

Comment

What Business Can Learn from the Lessons of History

A unique business conference and corporate presentation.

Tell us Your Favorite History Anecdote

History lovers have their own special history stories, incidents and episodes. Stories of heroism, self-sacrifice, victory against the odds, arrogance, the cruel hand of fate, irony and nobility. Tell us here what your favorite anecdote is.

tell us

The HistoryWow App

The HistoryWow App. Seventy fascinating and inspirational incidents and events from history - in a short, sharp format. Each great story is different and each one is a terrific read. A nice-sized, compact, mini history book of around 15,000 words, complete with pictures. And it's free.

Download

HistoryWow’s Featured Historical Figure of Note

Prince William, Duke of Cumberland (1721-1765)

British military commander. The third son of King George II. He gained great notoriety for the severity of his suppression of the Jacobite clans in the aftermath of his victory at the Battle of Culloden (1746). For this, he was dubbed ‘the Butcher’.

More at: History