Welcome to HistoryWow

Why ‘Wow’? Because history has a ‘Wow’ factor. History is rich in fascinating and inspirational incidents and events. Stories of heroism, self-sacrifice, humor, arrogance, foolishness, victory against the odds, the cruel hand of fate, irony and nobility.

History’s got the lot. Since 2012, HistoryWow’s aim, using only the finest historical reference material, has been to bring you some of these fascinating and inspirational incidents and events, in a short, sharp format. A little bit of history every day. But not enough to overload your busy lifestyles. We hope you enjoy HistoryWow!

History Question of the Day

The annual flooding of Egypt’s Nile River has been a vital source of that country’s agriculture needs for centuries, indeed thousands of years. In 1200 this flooding failed to occur. What were the consequences of this?

The answer tomorrow.

Yesterday's question and answer:

Among seafarers, scurvy was one of the main debilitating diseases up until the late 18th century. What was the principal conclusion of British surgeon James Lindt’s book of 1753 entitled ‘Treatise of the Scurvy’?

Answer: Lindt wrote, ‘The most sudden and good effects were … from oranges and lemons’. This led to the improvement of diet for sailors, first on British ships, specifically in the acknowledgement that Vitamin C was a principal preventative against scurvy.

Source: History Year by Year by Dorling Kindersley

More at: History

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History Question of the Week

Of the 63 clauses contained in the original Magna Carta signed by King John I of England at Runnymede in 1215, how many survive as laws today?

The answer on Thursday.

Submit Answer

The first correct answer to each week's question will receive a US$30 voucher to buy a history book of their choice.

Last week's question and answer:

Which famed Soviet composer died less than an hour before Joseph Stalin?

Answer: Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953). Both died on March 5, 1953.

Source: Shostakovich - A Life by Laurel E. Fay
 
More at: History

HistoryWow’s Golden List of Great History Books

There are many great history books, on a range of interesting topics. These are some of the ones we at HistoryWow think are especially good.

These excellent books are available at: History

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The HistoryWow Forum

CALLING ALL HISTORY BUFFS!

The fascinating thing about history is that there are a variety of different opinions and views on historical questions. Here is your chance to tell us what you think about a particular history question.

THIS WEEK'S HISTORYWOW FORUM TOPIC IS:

Historian Hugh Thomas has written in his ‘A History of the World’ that ‘in general, wars seem, like crime, to have been caused by the desire of the undisciplined to seize the goods of the comfortable.’ What do you think?

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What Business Can Learn from the Lessons of History

A unique business conference and corporate presentation.

Tell us Your Favorite History Anecdote

History lovers have their own special history stories, incidents and episodes. Stories of heroism, self-sacrifice, victory against the odds, arrogance, the cruel hand of fate, irony and nobility. Tell us here what your favorite anecdote is.

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The HistoryWow App

The HistoryWow App. Seventy fascinating and inspirational incidents and events from history - in a short, sharp format. Each great story is different and each one is a terrific read. A nice-sized, compact, mini history book of around 15,000 words, complete with pictures. And it's free.

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HistoryWow’s Featured Historical Figure of Note

Count Alfred von Schlieffen (1833-1913)

German soldier and military strategist. He was a staff officer in the Prussian wars of 1866 and 1870. He later developed a strategic plan for future wars by which France would be attacked through Belgium, while only a holding operation would be held on the Russian front. The plan was more or less followed in both 1914 and in 1940. Unsuccessfully in the former instance, and successfully in the latter.

More at: History